Category Archives: cocoa – NSNotificationCenter

Data Persistence in iPhone

http://www.edumobile.org/iphone/iphone-programming-tutorials/data-persistence-in-iphone/


In this application we enter our data to the textfield and save those data to the property list when application quits and reload data again from property list when application launched. So let see how it will be worked.


In this application we enter our data to the textfield and save those data to the property list when application quits and reload data again from property list when application launched. So let see how it will be worked.

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LocalNotification in iPhone OS4

http://www.edumobile.org/iphone/iphone-programming-tutorials/localnotification-in-iphone-os4/

In this application we will see how to LocalNotification worked. Basically, apple has added new services called Local Notification, which lets apps lunch notifications without the need for an external server.

In this application we will see how to LocalNotification worked. Basically, apple has added new services called Local Notification, which lets apps lunch notifications without the need for an external server.

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Adding Push Notifications to Your iPhone Applications Using RemObjects SDK (Xcode (iOS))

http://wiki.remobjects.com/wiki/Adding_Push_Notifications_to_Your_iPhone_Applications_Using_RemObjects_SDK_%28Xcode_%28iOS%29%29

This is an Articles topic on RemObjects SDK for Xcode
Feel free to add your notes to this topic below.
We have just published a full implementation for providing Push Notifications (APS) support for iPhone clients using RemObjects SDK, with minimal work required.

The current implementation is provided for servers written in .NET, although it should be easily adaptable to serve as a reference for implementing a similar functionality for RO/Delphi.

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What are Push Notifications?

To conserve battery power, as well as reduce CPU load and network traffic, iPhone does not allow applications to stay active in the background and keep communicating with servers. This makes traditional approaches for real-time notifications, such as RemObjects SDK’s event sinks unfeasible, but is an understandable limitation given that users expect their iPhone batteries to last a long time and want to keep a tab on (sometimes metered) network traffic.

In exchange, Apple provides so called Apple Push Services (APS) that provide a unified approach for all applications on the device to receive notifications while they are not running.

Details about how APS works can be found in Apple’s documentation in the iPhone SDK (link), but basically, the system works by iPhone applications registering a device token with their servers (that’s the server you, the application author, is providing), and the server then dispatching notification messages through infrastructure provided by Apple. Apple’s servers will consolidate notifications received from all the different sources (yours and others) and send them to the devices .

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How to build an Apple Push Notification provider server (tutorial)

http://blog.serverdensity.com/2009/07/10/how-to-build-an-apple-push-notification-provider-server-tutorial/

See also: How to renew your Apple Push Notification Push SSL Certificate

One of the widely anticipated features of the new iPhone OS 3.0 is push notifications which allow messages to be sent directly to an individual device relevant to the application that has been installed. Apple have demoed this as useful for news alerts, or IM notifications however it fits in perfectly with the nature of our server monitoring service, Server Density.

Server monitoring iPhone application alert view

As part of the product, we have an iPhone application that includes push notifications as an alerting option so you can be notified via push direct to your iPhone when one of your server alerts have been triggered. This is useful since our app can then be launched to instantly see the details of the server that has caused the alert.

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Basics of Notifications

http://iphonedevelopertips.com/cocoa/basics-of-notifications.html

What follows is a brief guide to working with Notifications in Cocoa. I’ll cover the basics, including registering an observer and posting notifications, just enough to start using notifications in your iPhone apps.

There is an instance of NSNotificationCenter available to every running iPhone application. This class acts as an intermediary to facilitate communication between objects that are interested in being notified at some point in the future (these objects are known as the observers) and a poster that posts to the notification center, resulting in all observers (registered for a specific notification) being called.

To give you an idea of where you might use notifications, consider how you might handle downloading of data in a background thread. I recently used notifications in this scenario as I wanted to be notified when a web-service call completed. Upon receiving a notification, I then proceeded to populate a view with the data retrieved, or with an error message if the data access failed.

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Apple Push Notification Services Tutorial: Part 2/2

http://www.raywenderlich.com/3525/apple-push-notification-services-tutorial-part-2

This is a post by iOS Tutorial Team member Matthijs Hollemans, an experienced freelance iOS developer available for hire!

This is the second part of a 2-part tutorial series on integrating Apple Push Notification Services (APNS) into an iPhone app.

In the first part of the tutorial series, you learned how to enable your iPhone app to receive push notifications, and how to send a test push notification using a PHP script.

In this second and final part of the tutorial series, you’ll learn how to make a simple app using APNS, and a simple PHP web service to power it!

Note: This tutorial is on the long side, so make sure you set aside a nice chunk of time (and some munchies!) to go through it. But it’s well worth it – once you finish you’ll have a functional app and web service using push notifications!

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